Wallenstein Palace

The Palace holds 23 houses and three gardens. The size of this palace demonstrates the struggle for power within Prague. Not to mention the desire of male dominance. The entire interior is decorated with upholstery from Italy and the Netherlands, as requested by the builder.

Rising up both floors is the Palace Chapel. Decorated with scenes of the tale of St Wenceslas this chapel is one of a kind in both location and appearance.

Wallenstein Palace originates between 1624 and 1630. It was named after Albrecht von Wallenstein, the general of the Hapsburg army. The intent was to look more grand than the Prague Castle. Today it is used to house the Senate. Over the course of centuries and wars, the original Wallenstein palace was completely destroyed, only a few paintings and personal belongings were left. It was rebuilt and remained in the Wallenstein family until after World War II when the Czechoslovak government bought the palace and renovated it for the purpose of housing government offices.

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    The Palace holds 23 houses and three gardens. The size of this palace demonstrates the struggle for power within Prague. Not to mention the desire of male dominance. The entire interior is decorated with upholstery from Italy and the Netherlands, as requested by the builder.

    Rising up both floors is the Palace Chapel. Decorated with scenes of the tale of St Wenceslas this chapel is one of a kind in both location and appearance.

    Wallenstein Palace originates between 1624 and 1630. It was named after Albrecht von Wallenstein, the general of the Hapsburg army. The intent was to look more grand than the Prague Castle. Today it is used to house the Senate. Over the course of centuries and wars, the original Wallenstein palace was completely destroyed, only a few paintings and personal belongings were left. It was rebuilt and remained in the Wallenstein family until after World War II when the Czechoslovak government bought the palace and renovated it for the purpose of housing government offices.